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  • #MurderTrending

    By: Gretchen McNeil
    Recommended for grade(s): 9

    @doctorfusionbebop: Some 17 y. o. chick named Dee Guerrera was just sent to Alcatraz 2.0 for killing her stepsister. So, how long do you think she’ll last? @morrisdavis72195: I hope she meets justice! She’ll get what’s coming to her! BWAHAHA! @EltonJohnForevzz: Me? I think Dee’s innocent. And I hope she can survive. WELCOME TO THE NEAR FUTURE, where good and honest citizens can enjoy watching the executions of society’s most infamous convicted felons, streaming live on The Postman app from the suburbanized prison island Alcatraz 2.0. When seventeen-year-old Dee Guerrera wakes up in a haze, lying on the ground of a dimly lit warehouse, she realizes she’s about to be the next victim of the app. Knowing hardened criminals are getting a taste of their own medicine in this place is one thing, but Dee refuses to roll over and die for a heinous crime she didn’t commit. Can Dee and her newly formed posse, the Death Row Breakfast Club, prove she’s innocent before she ends up wrongfully murdered for the world to see? Or will The Postman’s cast of executioners kill them off one by one? — From Disney Electronic Content

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  • #Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women

    By: Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale
    Recommended for grade(s): 10

    Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible. — From Annick Press

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 8

    Who’s Crazy? What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when such a label gets attached to your everyday experiences? In order to understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there’s no single definition of crazy, there’s no single experience that embodies it, and the word itself means different things—wild? extreme? disturbed? passionate?—to different people. (Don’t) Call Me Crazy is a conversation starter and guide to better understanding how our mental health affects us every day. Thirty-three writers, athletes, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and do not talk about mental health, help for better understanding how every person’s brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy. If you’ve ever struggled with your mental health, or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages, and let’s get talking. — From Algonquin Books

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 10

    Perfect for fans of Sophie Kinsella’s Finding Audrey and Nicola Yoon’s Everything, Everything, this is the poignant and uplifting story of Maeve, who is dealing with anxiety while falling in love with a girl who is not afraid of anything. Think positive. Don’t worry; be happy. Keep calm and carry on. Maeve has heard it all before. She’s been struggling with severe anxiety for a long time, and as much as she wishes it was something she could just talk herself out of, it’s not. She constantly imagines the worst, composes obituaries in her head, and is always ready for things to fall apart. To add to her troubles, her mom—the only one who really gets what Maeve goes through—is leaving for six months, so Maeve will be sent to live with her dad in Vancouver. Vancouver brings a slew of new worries, but Maeve finds brief moments of calm (as well as even more worries) with Salix, a local girl who doesn’t seem to worry about anything. Between her dad’s wavering sobriety, her very pregnant stepmom insisting on a home birth, and her bumbling courtship with Salix, this summer brings more catastrophes than even Maeve could have foreseen. Will she be able to navigate through all the chaos to be there for the people she loves? — From Knopf Books for Young Readers

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  • 100 Diagrams That Changed the World

    By: Scott Christianson

    ( 1  total rating )

    Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9, 10

    A collection of the most important ideas, theories, and concepts of all time. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World is a fascinating collection of the most significant plans, sketches, drawings, and illustrations that have influenced and shaped the way we think about the world. From primitive cave paintings to Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man to the complicated DNA helix drawn by Crick and Watson to the innovation of the iPod, they chart dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the world and its history. Arranged chronologically, each diagram is accompanied by informative text that makes even the most scientific breakthrough accessible to all. –From the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10

    Teens have questions about sex. This simple manual answers their questions–honestly, simply, and reliably. What does an orgasm feel like? Does masturbating have any long-term negative effects? Does alcohol kill brain cells? Teens have questions about sex; it’s a matter of who they ask and how reliable the answers are. Collected directly from teens and presented in a simple and accessible Q&A format, Elisabeth Henderson and Dr. Nancy Armstrong’s 100 Questions You’d Never Ask Your Parents provides information about sex, drug, body, and mood in a way that’s honest, nonjudgmental, and responsible. –from Roaring Book.

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  • 100 Sideways Miles

    By: Andrew Smith

    ( 2  total ratings )

    Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

    Finn Easton sees the world through miles instead of minutes. It’s how he makes sense of the world, and how he tries to convince himself that he’s a real boy and not just a character in his father’s bestselling cult-classic book. Finn has two things going for him: his best friend, the possibly-insane-but-definitely-excellent Cade Hernandez, and Julia Bishop, the first girl he’s ever loved. Then Julia moves away, and Finn is heartbroken. Feeling restless and trapped in the book, Finn embarks on a road trip with Cade to visit their college of choice in Oklahoma. When an unexpected accident happens and the boys become unlikely heroes, they take an eye-opening detour away from everything they thought they had planned—and learn how to write their own destiny. —from the website of Simon & Schuster

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  • 1001 Cranes

    By: Naomi Hirahara
    New import, not yet reviewed by Loose CanonTM

    With her parents on the verge of separating, a twelve-year-old Japanese American girl spends the summer in Los Angeles with her grandparents, where she folds paper cranes into wedding displays and learns how complicated relationships can be.

    — From the Publisher

  • 10th Grade: A Novel

    By: Joe Weisberg
    Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8, 9

    Jeremiah Reskin has big plans for tenth grade—he wants to make some friends and he wants to take a girl’s shirt off. It’s not going too well at first, but when he meets a group of semibohemian outcasts, things start to change. Soon he’s negotiating his way through group back rubs and trying to find the courage to make a move on Renee Shopmaker, the hottest girl in school. At the behest of his composition teacher, Jeremy’s also chronicling everything in his own novel—a disastrously ungrammatical but unflinching look at sophomore year. — From Random House

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  • 11 Birthdays

    By: Wendy Mass

    ( 1  total rating )

    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    It’s Amanda’s 11th birthday and she is super excited and after all, 11 is so different from 10. But from the start, everything goes wrong. The worst part of it all is that she and her best friend, Leo, with whom she’s shared every birthday, are on the outs and this will be the first birthday they have spent apart. When Amanda turns in for the night, glad to have her birthday behind her, she wakes up happy for a new day. Or is it? Her birthday seems to be repeating iself. What is going on?! And how can she fix it? Only time, friendship, and a little luck will tell… —from the Scholastic website

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  • 11/22/63

    By: Stephen King

    ( 1  total rating )

    Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12, College Plus

    On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? In this brilliantly conceived tour de force, Stephen King–who has absorbed the social, political, and popular culture of his generation more imaginatively and thoroughly than any other writer–takes readers on an incredible journey into the past and the possibility of altering it. It begins with Jake Epping, a thirty-five-year-old English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching GED classes. He asks his students to write about an event that changed their lives, and one essay blows him away–a gruesome, harrowing story about the night more than fifty years ago when Harry Dunning’s father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a sledgehammer. Reading the essay is a watershed moment for Jake, his life–like Harry’s, like America’s in 1963–turning on a dime. Not much later his friend Al, who owns the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to the past, a particular day in 1958. And Al enlists Jake to take over the mission that has become his obsession–to prevent the Kennedy assassination. So begins Jake’s new life as George Amberson, in a different world of Ike and JFK and Elvis, of big American cars and sock hops and cigarette smoke everywhere. From the dank little city of Derry, Maine (where there’s Dunning business to conduct), to the warmhearted small town of Jodie, Texas, where Jake falls dangerously in lov...

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 5

    Going on a road trip? See the silly side of travel as you explore the wackiest landmarks from around the world – a place where you can walk in real dinosaur tracks, a hotel where you sleep in an igloo, a crazy beard festival, a UFO museum, and so much more. You won’t believe our world is full of so many bizarre and wonderful places! An underwater mailbox, goats on the roof, walls of gum, a UFO museum, a hotel where you sleep in an igloo, a crazy beard festival, and so much more is packed into this book of 125 amazing destinations that you have to see to believe. So buckle your seat belt and get ready for a wild ride around the globe, featuring everything from hooky collections to radical replicas. These totally awesome destinations are paired with incredible full-colour photos and loads of fun facts. The world is truly a wacky and wonderful place – you’ll discover why on every page! — From National Geographic Books

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  • 13 Hangmen

    By: Art Corriveau
    Recommended for grade(s): 6

    “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony and his friends—five 13-year-old boys, all of whom are living in the same house in the same attic bedroom but at different times in history! None are ghosts, all are flesh and blood, and somehow all have come together in the attic room, visible only to one another. And all are somehow linked to a murder, a mystery, and a treasure. — From Abrams

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  • 13 Little Blue Envelopes

    By: Maureen Johnson

    ( 2  total ratings )

    Recommended for grade(s): 8, 9, 10

    When Ginny receives thirteen little blue envelopes and instructions to buy a plane ticket to London, she knows something exciting is going to happen. What Ginny doesn’t know is that she will have the adventure of her life and it will change her in more ways than one. Life and love are waiting for her across the Atlantic, and the thirteen little blue envelopes are the key to finding them in this funny, romantic, heartbreaking novel. ALA and YALSA Teens Top Ten 2006. —from the HarperCollins website

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  • 13 Minutes: A Novel

    By: Sarah Pinborough
    New import, not yet reviewed by Loose CanonTM

    “Mean Girls for the Instagram age.” —The Times (London) The New York Times bestselling author known for her thrilling twists is back: They say you should keep your friends close and your enemies closer, but when you’re a teenage girl, it’s hard to tell them apart. Natasha doesn’t remember how she ended up in the icy water that night, but she does know this—it wasn’t an accident, and she wasn’t suicidal. Her two closest friends are acting strangely, and Natasha turns to Becca, the best friend she dumped years before when she got popular, to help her figure out what happened. Natasha’s sure that her friends love her. But does that mean they didn’t try to kill her? 13 Minutes is a psychological thriller with a killer twist from the #1 internationally bestselling author Sarah Pinborough.

    — From the Publisher

  • 13 Reasons Why

    By: Jay Asher

    ( 1  total rating )

    Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10

    You can’t stop the future. You can’t rewind the past. The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play. Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker–his classmate and crush–who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why. Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever. Need to talk? Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) anytime if you are in the United States. It’s free and confidential. –From Penguin

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 6, 7

    No one will want to skip any of the twelve short stories and one poem that make up this collection by some of the most celebrated contemporary writers of teen fiction. The big bar mitzvah that goes suddenly, wildly, hilariously out of control. A first kiss — and a realization about one’s sexual orientation. A crush on a girl that ends up putting the boy who likes her in the hospital. A pair of sneakers a kid has to have. By turns funny and sad, wrenching and poignant, the moments large and small described in these stories capture perfectly the agony and ecstasy of being thirteen. —from the website of Simon & Schuster

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  • 14 Cows for America

    By: Carmen Agra Deedy
    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    In June of 2002, a very unusual ceremony begins in a far-flung village in western Kenya. An American diplomat is surrounded by hundreds of Maasai people. A gift is about to be bestowed upon the American men, women, and children, and he is there to accept it. The gift is as unexpected as it is extraordinary. A mere nine months have passed since the September 11 attacks, and hearts are raw as these legendary Maasai warriors offer their gift to a grieving people half a world away. Word of the gift will travel newswires around the globe, and for the heartsick American nation, the gift of fourteen cows emerges from the choking dust and darkness as a soft light of hope and friendship. This New York Times best seller recounts the true story from Wilson Kimeli Naiyomah of a touching gift bestowed on the United States by a tribe of Maasai Warriors in the wake of the September 11th attacks. With the stunning paintings of Thomas Gonzalez, master storyteller Carmen Agra Deedy hits all the right notes in this elegant story of generosity that crosses boundaries, nations, and cultures. — From Peachtree

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  • 145 Street Short Stories

    By: Walter Dean Myers
    Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8, 9

    The first week of his senior year, everything changed. That’s when Mack met Kitty. She hadn’t finished the sonnet she wrote for him, but she had finished Mack. From that minute on, he was stupid in love. That’s just Kitty and Mack. But everybody on the block has a story to tell. A salty, wrenchingly honest collection of stories set on one block of 145th Street. We get to know the oldest resident; the cop on the beat; fine Peaches and her girls, Squeezie; Monkeyman; and Benny, a fighter on the way to a knockout. We meet Angela, who starts having prophetic dreams after her father is killed, and Big Joe, who wants a bang-up funeral while he’s still around to enjoy it. Some of these stories are private, and some are the ones behind the headlines. In each one, characters jump off the page and pull readers right into the mix on 1-4-5. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • 172 Hours on the Moon

    By: Johan Harstad
    Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

    It’s been decades since anyone set foot on the moon. Now three ordinary teenagers, the winners of NASA’s unprecedented, worldwide lottery, are about to become the first young people in space—and change their lives forever. Mia, from Norway, hopes this will be her punk band’s ticket to fame and fortune. Midori believes it’s her way out of her restrained life in Japan. Antoine, from France, just wants to get as far away from his ex-girlfriend as possible. It’s the opportunity of a lifetime, but little do the teenagers know that something sinister is waiting for them on the desolate surface of the moon. And in the black vacuum of space… no one is coming to save them. —from the website at Hachette

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

    Come full circle with 180 new, exciting poems selected and introduced by Billy Collins. Inspired by Billy Collins’s poem-a-day program for American high schools that he began through the Library of Congress, the original Poetry 180: A Turning Back to Poetry was a gathering of clear, contemporary poems aimed at a wide audience. In 180 More, Collins continues his ambitious mission of exposing readers of all ages to the best of today’s poetry. Here are another 180 hospitable, engaging, reader-friendly poems, offering surprise and delight in a wide range of literary voices–comic, melancholy, reflective, irreverent. If poetry is the original travel literature, this anthology contains 180 vehicles ready to carry you away to unexpected places. –From the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 5, 6, 7, 8

    “Tell me how to live so many lives at once …” Fowzi, who beats everyone at dominoes; Ibtisam, who wanted to be a doctor; Abu Mahmoud, who knows every eggplant and peach in his West Bank garden; mysterious Uncle Mohammed, who moved to the mountain; a girl in a red sweater dangling a book bag; children in velvet dresses who haunt the candy bowl at the party; Baba Kamalyari, age 71; Mr. Dajani and his swans; Sitti Khadra, who never lost her peace inside. Maybe they have something to tell us. Naomi Shihab Nye has been writing about being Arab-American, about Jerusalem, about the West Bank, about family all her life. These new and collected poems of the Middle East — sixty in all — appear together here for the first time. National Book Award Finalist. –From the website at HarperCollins

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  • 1984

    By: George Orwell

    ( 12  total ratings )

    Recommended for grade(s): 11, 12

    Thought Police. Big Brother. Orwellian. These words have entered our vocabulary because of George Orwell’s classic dystopian novel, 1984. The story of one man’s nightmare odyssey as he pursues a forbidden love affair through a world ruled by warring states and a power structure that controls not only information but also individual thought and memory, 1984 is a prophetic, haunting tale. More relevant than ever before, 1984 exposes the worst crimes imaginable—the destruction of truth, freedom, and individuality. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11

    In this 1870 science-fiction classic, obsessed Captain Nemo and his prisoners descend beneath the sea in his secret submarine, the Nautilus, for nonstop adventure and suspense. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • 2001: A Space Odyssey

    By: Arthur C. Clarke

    ( 4  total ratings )

    Recommended for grade(s): 10, 11

    2001: A Space Odyssey is the classic science fiction novel that changed the way we looked at the stars and ourselves….2001: A Space Odyssey inspired what is perhaps the greatest science fiction film ever made-brilliantly imagined by the late Stanley Kubrick…. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente

    By: Wilfred Santiago
    Recommended for grade(s): 8

    Wilfred Santiago’s instant classic 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente is a human drama of courage, faith, and dignity, inspired by the life of the acclaimed Pittsburgh Pirates baseball star who died too young. 21 chronicles Clemente’s life from his early days growing up, through the highlights of his career, capturing the grit of his rise from an impoverished Puerto Rican childhood to the majesty of his performance on the field, and to his fundamental decency off of it. Santiago’s inviting style combines realistic attention to detail and expressive cartooning to great effect. — From Fantagraphics Books

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  • 23 Minutes

    By: Vivian Vande Velde
    Recommended for grade(s): 7, 8

    By both society’s measure and her own, fifteen-year-old Zoe Mahar is pretty much a loser. Then one day she ducks into Spencerport Savings and Loan simply to get out of the rain–and witnesses a bank robbery gone horrifyingly wrong. The good news is that Zoe has a unique ability: she can play back time and repeat events. But it’s not an unlimited deal–she can only jump 23 minutes, and her first playback creates an even more disastrous outcome. Zoe has only 10 tries to get it right before this particular 23 minutes becomes irreversible. In the process of trying to become the heroine she doesn’t believe she can be, Zoe learns about herself and realizes that there is more to who she is than she thought. –From Highlights Press

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  • Recommended for grade(s): 3

    Of all the great holidays kids have to celebrate, you’d think at least Valentine’s Day should be Willie-proof. You give some cards, you get some cards- what could be simpler, right? Wrong!! I, Willimena Thomas, managed to find a way to mess up even Valentine’s Day – 23 ways in fact. —from the website at Disney

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  • 25 Perfect Days

    By: Mark Tullus
    Recommended for grade(s): 9, 10, 11, 12

    A totalitarian state doesn’t just happen overnight. It’s a slow, dangerous slide. 25 Perfect Days chronicles the path into a hellish future of food shortages, contaminated water, sweeping incarceration, an ultra-radical religion, and the extreme measures taken to reduce the population. Through twenty-five interlinked stories, each written from a different character’s point of view, 25 Perfect Days captures the sacrifice, courage, and love needed to survive and eventually overcome this dystopian nightmare. —Vincere Press

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  • 26 Fairmont Avenue

    By: Tomie DePaola
    Recommended for grade(s): 3

    Tomie’s family starts building their new house at 26 Fairmount Avenue in 1938, just as a hurricane hits town, starting off a busy, crazy year. Tomie has many adventures all his own, including eating chocolate with his Nana Upstairs, only to find out-the hard way-that they have eaten chocolate laxative. He tries to skip kindergarten when he finds out he won’t learn to read until first grade. “I’ll be back next year,” he says. When Tomie goes to see Snow White, he creates another sensation. Tomie dePaola’s childhood memories are hilarious, and his charming illustrations are sure to please. A Newbery Honor Book. —from the website at Penguin Random House

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  • 27 Magic Words

    By: Sharelle Byars Moranville
    Recommended for grade(s): 4, 5

    An irrepressible ten-year-old must reconcile her fantasies with reality in this beautifully written novel about facing the future. Although eleven-year-old Kobi’s parents sailed into a storm at sea five years ago, she knows they are alive. If she says “Avanti!” she can see them. Now that her wealthy Parisian Grandmama is sending Kobi and her sister away to live with Uncle Wim in Iowa, she will need the magic words her mother left her more than ever. To fit in at her new American school , Kobi tells lies that soon catch up with her, and leans heavily on her magic. In a heart-wrenching climax, she must confront not only the untruths she has told others but the stories she has made herself believe. Only then will she be able to grieve for her parents and move on with her life. –From Holiday House

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  • 27: First Set

    By: Charles Soule, Renzo Podesta
    Recommended for grade(s): 8

    Suffering from a neurological disorder, twenty-seven-year-old rock guitarist Will Garland becomes aware of the “27 Club,” whose members include Hendrix, Cobain, Joplin, and Morrison. — From Image Comics

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370 pages